The Completely Ignored Podcast
Bonus episode: Pat Mastroianni on the music of Degrassi

Bonus episode: Pat Mastroianni on the music of Degrassi

April 25, 2018

In this special bonus episode, we spend over an hour with Canadian TV mainstay Pat Mastroianni, best known for his portrayal of the fedora-lovin’ Joey Jeremiah on Degrassi Jr. High, Degrassi High and Degrassi: The Next Generation. We talk about the music of the Degrassi universe, both the real stuff and the fake stuff: the Zit Remedy, the Gourmet Scum, the Savages (the fake Degrassi universe band), Savages (the real British indie band), the Pogues, Pink Floyd, Images in Vogue, the Spoons, Gowan, Harem Scarem, Drake and (strangely) Dean Martin. We also chat about the legendary Fantastic Voyage program from Ryerson's CKLN, how Jonathan Torrens played a key role in the Degrassi reboot (and eventually shapeshifted into “Shane”) and the healthy appetite for face time w/ Degrassi alumini amongst the Comic-Con/Fan Expo crowd.

S4, E10: Dear Science by TV on the Radio

S4, E10: Dear Science by TV on the Radio

April 16, 2018

Cam and Sammy wrap their 4th season of the podcast with a look at TV on the Radio and their third full-length, 2008’s Dear Science. Lots of New York talk and lots of talk about bands who can pull off sprawling multi-genre music… and bands who can’t. This somehow parlays into some words about the dying days of buying CDs, music collectible shows and vintage Canadian artists w/o large digital footprints, including the Sons of Freedom, Ray Condo, the Bourbon Tabernacle Choir and many more. It’s neat! The episode and the season ends with a quick chat about Boards of Canada and the greatness and the weirdness of Prince’s self-titled 1979 effort. See ya later! 

S4, E9: Bloom by Beach House

S4, E9: Bloom by Beach House

April 8, 2018

Let's get hazy, dreamy, swoony and spacey with Bloom, the 2012 fourth full-length from Beach House. Cam and Sammy love this band and it shows! They touch on the fleetingness of anticipating new music that comes with age, the timeliness of Beach House itself and do a 101 on French composer Michel Legrand and whether movie scores and title tracks qualify as "hits". The episode wraps with a chat about new tunes from Stephen Malkmus, a detailed discussion about the video for Phil Collins' "Against All Odds" (including the scary mask and scary James Woods parts) plus a really quick shoutout to Ric Ocasek and the Cars. 

S4, E8: Talkie Walkie by Air

S4, E8: Talkie Walkie by Air

April 1, 2018

We’re going to France and our passport... is... uh... music! It’s the third studio full-length from Air and it’s called Walkie Talkie, a sadly under-remembered album that sounds as smart and sophisticated in 2018 as it did in 2004. Cam and Sammy remember the times Air were basically the soundtrack to cafe livin’ in the late 1990s and early 2000s, why some bands (i.e. this band) don’t need to be seen live plus why comparing Air to Daft Punk is lame and lazy. The episode ends with a look at Lana Del Rey (her music and her marketing) plus Twin Shadow and a teeny tiny chat about Doug and the Slugs (again). 

S4, E7: PCD by the Pussycat Dolls

S4, E7: PCD by the Pussycat Dolls

March 25, 2018

The fur flies on this episode of the Completely Ignored Podcast as Ali Manion (partnership manager, Diply) joins us for a look back at the manufactured meows of the Pussycat Dolls and their 2005 debut PCD. Together, we unpack the concept of “a brand as a band”, ponder what pop music was like pre-social media and try to force a parallel to silly stage stuff like STOMP and Riverdance. We also have two random chats about Hard Candy (the Madonna-funded line of fitness studios, not the Counting Crows album) and Coyote Ugly (here, primarily why it was a trashy thing). Things end with a few words about new tunes from Miguel and First Aid Kit.  

S4, E6: The Rising by Bruce Springsteen

S4, E6: The Rising by Bruce Springsteen

March 19, 2018

A dense, deep chat about “The Boss” here as my high school pal Adam Sidenberg and I revisit Bruce Springsteen’s 2002 full-length The Rising. Spoiler alert: Lots of 9/11 talk in terms of musical responses and how that time and this album were a turning point in how we view this artist. We also assess about the murkiness of late 1980s and 1990s Bruce, whether his tribute to Joe Strummer on the Grammys “made sense” and if he’d make the cut in a totally-fake reboot of the Traveling Wilburys. We wrap by talking trash about U2 and whether their last two albums were actual crap or assumed crap. Hint: The latter. 

S4, S5: Live. Love. A$AP by A$AP Rocky

S4, S5: Live. Love. A$AP by A$AP Rocky

March 12, 2018

Another Completely Ignored first as Cam and Sammy talk about a mixtape: Live. Love. A$AP, the 2011 debut from Harlem lyrcist and fashion fave A$AP Rocky. After a bit of "What's a mixtape, anyway?" exposition, Cam and Sammy dig deep into what defines NYC hip-hop, why Clams Casino mixtapes are both trippy and awesome, and where/how A$AP slots (circa 2018) alongside Kendrick Lamar, Schoolboy Q, Danny Brown and other ascendents of the early 2010s. The guys also talk quite a bit about distribution (h/t to Rick Ross). The episode wraps with a short convo about why Chet Baker's music is 100% chill (even when his personal life was a GD wreck) plus a "remember these guys?" look back at Philly psych weirdos Barbo Pond.  

S4, E4: Fever to Tell by the Yeah Yeah Yeahs

S4, E4: Fever to Tell by the Yeah Yeah Yeahs

March 6, 2018

Cam and Sammy (fake) travel to New York City and back to 2003 on this episode for a revisit of the Yeah Yeah Yeahs debut full-length Fever to Tell. We talk about where the YYYs slot in amongst the finest acts of “NYC in the 2000s”, when something becomes retro, how Jay Z retired a million years ago (and yet he’s still making music) and how The Who retired a hundred million years ago (and yet they’re still playing shows). The episode ends with a mini-chat about Deer Tick, which is layered with “they sound like the Replacements” comments, obvi. 

S4, E3: Le Noise by Neil Young

S4, E3: Le Noise by Neil Young

February 28, 2018

This podcast is a deep, deep dive in the Neil Young back catalogue and his 30th studio full-length Le Noise. Toronto-based digital expert Karim Kanji guests for a high-quality chat about what makes Neil Young Neil Young and why the dude is still able to create moments that connect four decades into his career. Cam and Karim also dig a bit on Daniel Lanois, Neil's tunes about Kurt and whether its wise to see a fave artist for the first time once they're well into their "golden years". Oh, and we briefly talk about Pono and CES too. We wrap with a quick gab about July Talk, the Black Panther soundtrack... and soundtrack albums, in general. 

S4, E2: Funeral by the Arcade Fire

S4, E2: Funeral by the Arcade Fire

February 21, 2018

Funeral was the 2004 debut full-legnth from the Arcade Fire and it's generally regarded as one of the strongest first efforts in recent memory. Toronto-based digital guru/ninja/svengali/person Lindsay Lynch seconds this "emotion". She joins Cam for this episode, talking about small bands that seem big, why concerts on Toronto Island were really not the greatest, the band (and the things) Islands and how her relationship with the Arcade Fire has evolved/maintained through their mushy middle ages. The episode wraps with a little chat about why it's fun to dance to Daniel Caeser in public and why it's now problematic to dance to Crystal Castles anywhere. 

S4, E1: Heligoland by Massive Attack

S4, E1: Heligoland by Massive Attack

February 13, 2018

The Completely Ignored podcast returns for a fourth season with a focus on 10 "Albums of the 2000s". Kicking things off is Massive Attack and its 2010 full-length Heligoland. Cam and Sammy both gush over the uniqueness and chill-AF excellence of this band. talk about how the infrequency of their music is a strength and ponder whether the "pile on the guest vocalists" approach had an influence over Damon Albarn for the third and fourth Gorillaz records. The show wraps with a quick chat about new tunes from MGMT and a less-quick chat about the passing of The Fall's Mark E. Smith, how a mere mortal can tackle The Fall's back catalogue plus reasons why Smith never got much credit for the LOLz he put into the tunes he wrote.

S3, E6: Original Pirate Material by The Streets

S3, E6: Original Pirate Material by The Streets

September 5, 2017

We take things back to the early months of 2002 and Original Pirate Material, the debut full-length from grime-y UK artist The Streets. A singularly unique time capsule of a time/place, Cam and Sammy look to unpack where this album fits in the annals of British music and why the gloomy, paranoid aura of this album still feels semi-fresh more than 15 years later. We also ponder why Mike Skinner took such a huge step back commercial within a few albums and shoot down any suggestion that he was the Eminem of Britain. We close things out with a random chat about Ken Burns' 10-part PBS documentary on jazz and whether Neii Young's "Powderfinger" sounds like a song that should've been written by The Band (spoiler: It totally does!). 

S3, E5: Look Sharp! by Joe Jackson

S3, E5: Look Sharp! by Joe Jackson

August 23, 2017

Not to be confused with Michael Jackson's dad (or the disgraced baseball player), Joe Jackson is the profilic British singer/songwriter and subject matter for S3, E5 of the podcast. His 1979 debut Look Sharp! is full of songs that are both bratty and precocious. Cam and Sammy unpack this era of UK songwriters stuck between New Wave and elsewhere with Sammy sharing why this album never gets old and why Joe Jackson is one of his fave all-time live acts. The guys also talk (again) about the deep impact of Much Music and the New Music plus briefly touch on how Joe Jackson looked kinda weird sometime. The episode closes with some chit-chat about Chris Stapleton, John Coltrane and which Mogwai albums feature the best noisy noises. 

S3, E4: Is This It by the Strokes

S3, E4: Is This It by the Strokes

August 7, 2017

It's our first episode about an album from the current century! Still, we're going way back to 2001 to talk about the much-hyped, much-loved first full-length from the Strokes, Is This It. We gently discuss whether this and other albums of its vintage are now "retro" and revisit how well them there NYC bands from 2000-2010 have aged. Cam and Sammy also each talk about individual encounters with various Strokes (spoiler: Fab and Albert, respectively) and whether the Strokes ACTUALLY sounded like the Velvet Underground. We close with some heavy randomness by talking about Concrete Blonde, the Travelling Wilburys and Grizzly Bear.

S3, E3: Murmur by R.E.M.

S3, E3: Murmur by R.E.M.

July 31, 2017

Cam and Sammy stick around the early 1980s and profusely gush over R.E.M. and its first full-length, 1983's Murmur. In this episode, we go deep on the first five R.E.M. albums, I.R.S. Records, hidden gems from the band's later years and why R.E.M. is so accessible... yet so hard to categorize. Cam also attemps to defend "Shiny Happy People", fairly unsuccessfully. We wrap by talking about some new stuff from Alvvays and some slightly less-new stuff from that guy Bob Dylan. 

S3, E2: Psychocandy by the Jesus and Mary Chain

S3, E2: Psychocandy by the Jesus and Mary Chain

July 23, 2017

It's a gnarly, noisy debut from an dour, angry band. It's Psychocandy, the 1985 first full-length from the Jesus and Mary Chain. Cam and Sammy talk about noise and melodies and why JAMC weren't shoegaze, New Wave, goth... but were kind of all of those things (but not reall)! We also talk about the Reid brothers and their hair, the Reid brothers and their fist fights, and how film, commerce can rebirth a band. To close things out, we revisit the Beautiful South (and how they totally were NOT Britpop) plus talk a bit about random YouTube covers of "Maggot Brain".

S3, E1: My Aim is True by Elvis Costello

S3, E1: My Aim is True by Elvis Costello

July 17, 2017

The Completely Ignored Podcast is back and (slightly) better than ever. New season, New topic. Debut albums! To start, we go back 40 years. Summer of 1977 and the first full-length from Elvis Costello, My Aim is True. The audio on this episode is a bit weak, unlike the audio on this album which is STRONG. We talk Elvis, that other Elvis, both Doug & the Slugs AND the Jitters, and why even Costello's not great moments are still not all that bad. 

S2, E10: Up to Here by the Tragically Hip

S2, E10: Up to Here by the Tragically Hip

April 18, 2017

Season Two wraps with a chat about iconic Canadian classic rock heroes the Tragically Hip and their 1989 debut full-length Up to Here. Where to even start with this band? Well, we try to compare them to R.E.M., the Black Crowes, Pearl Jam and the Dave Matthews Band. It kinda works. It kinda doesn't. We also ponder what it meant when Gord Downie started strumming an accoustic guitar in 1996 and whether those two "other guys" in the Jeff Healey Band were twins. We also discuss how music and media worlds collided in a sad but fairly touching way during the Tragically Hip's victory lap in the summer of 2016. The episode wraps with a quick chat about Gorillaz, the varied brilliance of Damon Albarn and finally, Canadian cartoon rockers Prozzäk.

S2, E9: Superior Cackling Hen by the Bourbon Tabernacle Choir

S2, E9: Superior Cackling Hen by the Bourbon Tabernacle Choir

April 6, 2017

The fellas go back to late, late 20th century Toronto for this episode as they talk up the Bourbon Tabernacle Choir and their stellar 1992 full-length Superior Cackling Hen. Why didn’t this band become more of "a thing" beyond the GTA? We don’t know and we never will!!! They were talented and fun AF yet this amazing album got stuck in the murky middle between major labels and independence. Good times! The episode also labels Bran Van 3000 as a “connective tissue” outfit, talks quite a bit about both Change of Heart and Little Feat plus features a random discussion about Dusty Springfield. Enjoy!

S2, E8: Miss America by Mary Margaret O’Hara

S2, E8: Miss America by Mary Margaret O’Hara

March 26, 2017

In the sphere of "one-and-done" artists, few approach the mastery and mystique of Toronto's Mary Margaret O'Hara. Her sole studio full-length, 1988's Miss America, is the subject of this episode as Cam and Sammy dissect this enigmatic classic. They talk about late 1980s CanCon (again), why artists like MMO are far rarer in the digital age and the career arch of the Cowboy Junkies. The episode ends in a super namedrop-y fashion with mentions of This Mortal Coil, Tim Buckley and the Cocteau Twins. Note: Apologies on the audio. It improves within the first 10 minutes.